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A Young Climate Scientist’s Moral Awareness

As we work through our edit, I very much appreciate the following personal reflection, which comes from Yale Climate Connections. Today they posted a radio interview with Sarah Myhre of the University of Washington. She studies how global warming affects marine ecosystems. Her work has serious implications, so she’s unable to put it away when she goes home.

Myhre: “My place of deep happiness is being outside amidst mountains and oceans and animals and places where I feel the most connected to the natural world. And coming to terms with the kind of change that’s in front of us, I mean we’re talking about changing the entire planet forever. And there are major emotional and existential crises that I think scientists and citizens are grappling with.”

Sarah often considers what the world will be like when her son grows up.

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Myhre: “And all of those emotions, all that commitment to my son’s life in the future … it all informs the kind of professional that I want to be.”

Keeping the serious consequences of climate change top of mind can be emotionally taxing, but Myhre says it’s helped her grow personally and professionally.

Myhre: “It’s really shifted my thinking from the world being about, you know, me and my life and my career … to thinking about people in the future and the suffering that is possible, and my moral responsibility to those people and to my family.”

Reporting credit: ChavoBart Digital Media.
Photo: Courtesy of Sarah Myhre

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